About

Meet The Innkeepers

Meet The Innkeepers

Kelly and Diana Combs purchased Rosemary Hall from a bank repossession and moved to North Augusta from Southern California in 2009. The inn had been closed for over a year and a half. The couple not only started a business, but took on the challenge to completely restore, renovate, and redecorate, bringing Rosemary back to a state of beauty and grandeur from a bygone era. Over the course of ten years, Diana and Kelly have established an award-winning bed and breakfast enjoyed by thousands of guests both locally and from around the world.

Diana is a Nebraska native and Kelly grew up in Southern California. The two met and wed while attending the University of Nebraska after which they moved to Southern California to start a career and family.

Kelly worked primarily in the medical device sales and sales management businesses. In 2002, Kelly started a real estate development company specializing in medical office buildings. Diana devoted most of her time to raising their two now grown children, Sarah and Caroline.

Rosemary Inn

Site Visits

Site Visits

Rosemary Inn Bed & Breakfast is a private home, open only for the exclusive use of its guests. Out of respect for the privacy of the owners and our guests, drop-in inquiries cannot be accepted. We invite you to call for an appointment or email us. We would be delighted to have you in for a visit so we can discuss all the wonderful possibilities for your special event.

Rosemary Inn

History Of Rosemary Hall

History Of Rosemary Hall

Rosemary Hall, the stunning estate built on the hills of North Augusta, South Carolina, overlooks the town center, the Savannah River and downtown Augusta, Georgia. Listed in the National Registry of Historic Places in America, this meticulously crafted mansion became the residence of North Augusta's founder and developer, James U. Jackson, in 1902.

Mr. Jackson designed Rosemary to echo the classic Southern style of the antebellum era, giving the mansion twelve stately Corinthian columns, large plantation windows and a sweeping wraparound veranda. The home's interior architecture and décor, however, reflect the Gilded Age in which the construction occurred; most notably the embellishment of paneled ceilings and walls, an elaborate English staircase complete with large lighted Newell posts, luxurious moldings, immense pocket doors and custom stained glass throughout.

For construction of the home, Jackson ordered thirty train cars loaded with lumber, just to build the massive structure. Craftsman inspected each piece and discarded any that contained a knot hole. He wanted his beloved residence built to the highest level of perfection.

For the interior's splendor, Jackson utilized the very rare and expensive rosemary pine. Jackson personally hand-selected each piece of this exquisite wood to achieve the optimum burl and luster he desired. So proud of his masterpiece, he named the mansion Rosemary Hall, after the exclusive wood and its grand presence.

After Rosemary's completion, Jackson moved his adored wife Edith Barrington King Jackson and their five children from Augusta, to their new home. They were, in chronological order, Walter Mixer, (from Jackson's first marriage to Minnie Falligant, who died in 1883) Daisy King, Edith Barrington, James Urquart Jr. and John Williams.